Revista Española de Cardiología (English Edition) Revista Española de Cardiología (English Edition)
Rev Esp Cardiol. 2011;64:654-60 - Vol. 64 Num.08 DOI: 10.1016/j.rec.2011.05.005

Blood Pressure Control in Hypertensive Women Aged 65 Years or Older in a Primary Care Setting. MERICAP Study

José L. Llisterri a,, Vivencio Barrios b, Alex de la Sierra c, Vicente Bertomeu d, Carlos Escobar e, Diego González-Segura f

a Centro de Salud Ingeniero Joaquín Benlloch, Valencia, Spain
b Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain
c Servicio de Medicina Interna, Hospital Mútua de Terrassa, Terrassa, Barcelona, Spain
d Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital Universitario de San Juan, Sant Joan d’Alacant, Alicante, Spain
e Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital Infanta Sofía, San Sebastián de los Reyes, Madrid, Spain
f Departamento Médico, Laboratorios Almirall S.A., Barcelona, Spain

Refers to

An Opportunity to Know About Resistant Hypertension in our Area
Rafael Vidal-Pérez, Fernando Otero-Raviña, Ricardo Besada Gesto, José Ramón González-Juanatey
Rev Esp Cardiol. 2012;65:109
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Keywords

Arterial hypertension. Control. Women. Primary care.

Abstract

Introduction and objectives

The available information regarding blood pressure control in women is scarce. This study was aimed at assessing blood pressure control and predictors of a lack of blood pressure control in the primary care setting in a large sample of hypertensive women.

Methods

Women aged 65 years or older with an established diagnosis of hypertension (≥6 months of evolution) were included in a cross-sectional, multicenter study. Blood pressure readings were taken following the current guidelines, and the value for each visit was the average of two separate measurements. Adequate blood pressure control was defined as <140/90mmHg (<130/80mmHg for diabetics).

Results

A total of 4274 hypertensive women (mean age: 73.6 years [6.1 years]) were included in the study; blood pressure was controlled in 29.8% (95% confidence interval: 28.4%-31.1%) of the study population. Combined therapy was administered in 67.6% of patients (46.3% with 2 drugs and 21.7% with 3 or more drugs). The most common organ damage was left ventricular hypertrophy (33.8%) and the most common associated condition was heart failure (19%). Poor blood pressure control was more frequent in patients with more cardiovascular risk factors, organ damage, and associated clinical conditions (P<.01). A more recent hypertension diagnosis, LDL-cholesterol >115mg/dl, monotherapy, obesity, and hemoglobin A1c ≥7% were associated with a lack of blood pressure control (P<.0001).

Conclusions

Only 3 in 10 hypertensive women aged ≥65 years monitored daily in the primary care setting achieved their blood pressure goals. A recent diagnosis of hypertension was the main predictor of poor blood pressure control.

1885-5857/© 2011 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved

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