Revista Española de Cardiología (English Edition) Revista Española de Cardiología (English Edition)
Rev Esp Cardiol. 2006;59:671-8 - Vol. 59 Num.07 DOI: 10.1016/S1885-5857(07)60026-7

Cardiovascular Risk Factor Progression in Young Males at 15-Year Follow-Up in the General Military Academy of Zaragoza (AGEMZA) Study

Martín Laclaustra-Gimeno a, María P González-García a, José A Casasnovas-Lenguas a, Emilio Luengo-Fernández a, Montserrat León-Latre a, Pilar Portero-Pérez a, Alfonso del Río-Ligorit a, Armando Giner-Soria a, Ignacio J Ferreira-Montero a

a Unidad de Investigación Cardiovascular, Instituto Aragonés de Ciencias de la Salud, Zaragoza, Spain.

Keywords

Cohort. Cholesterol. Lipids. Cardiovascular risk factors. Hypertension.

Abstract

Introduction and objectives. The AGEMZA cohort comprises military men whose risk factors were studied in 1985 when they were 20 years old. As these men reached the age of 35 years, we investigated the stability of or changes in anthropometric measures, lipid levels and arterial pressure, and looked for interrelationships between any changes. Methods. In 2000, we collected new data (by cross-sectional study) on body mass index (BMI), cholesterol, cholesterol fractions, triglycerides and blood pressure, which could be compared with the original data. Persistence or tracking was evaluated using standardized regression coefficients and odds for persistence within the same quintile. Current data were modelled using multivariate regression models. Results. In the 250 subjects studied, significant changes were observed in the following variables: weight +12.1 kg, BMI +3.9 kg/m², cholesterol +68.0 mg/dL, HDL cholesterol ­-5.2 mg/dL, LDL cholesterol +57.9 mg/dL, and triglycerides +76.3 mg/dL. The degree of persistence was high for all variables, except for diastolic blood pressure. Persistence was most pronounced for BMI, cholesterol, and LDL cholesterol. The changes observed indicate an increase in cardiovascular risk that adds to the effect of aging. The change in lipid profile was mainly influenced by the increase in BMI experienced, whereas blood pressure was mainly influenced by the final BMI attained. In addition, being a current smoker was associated with worse cholesterol fractions and triglyceride levels. Conclusions. Cardiovascular risk factors increase during the third decade of the life. Early evaluation (after adolescence) enables the identification of individuals who will later be at an increased risk. Modifiable risk factors were identified, such as weight increase and smoking. Preventive measures should be designed for these groups.

1885-5857/© 2006 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved

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