Revista Española de Cardiología (English Edition) Revista Española de Cardiología (English Edition)
Rev Esp Cardiol. 2006;59:1026-32 - Vol. 59 Num.10

Coronary Disease Risk and Prevalence of Heart Disease in Primary Care Patients With Hypertension and Renal Disease

Juan Cosín-Aguilar a, Amparo Hernándiz-Martínez a, Rosa Arístegui-Urrestarazu b, Xavier Masramón-Morell c, Amparo Aguilar-Llopis a, Luís Rodríguez-Padial d, José L Zamorano-Gómez e

a Unidad de Cardiocirculatorio, Centro de investigación Hospital La Fe, Valencia, Spain
b Departamento Médico, Laboratorios Pfizer S.A., Madrid, Spain
c Euroclin, Barcelona, Spain.
d Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital Virgen de la Salud, Toledo, Spain
e Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital Clínico San Carlos, Madrid, Spain.

Keywords

Systemic hypertension. Cardiovascular risk. Renal damage.

Abstract

Introduction and objectives. The presence of renal disease significantly alters the cardiovascular risk of patients with high blood pressure. However, few studies have examined renal parameters in primary care patients. The objectives of this study were to investigate cardiovascular risk and the factors influencing it in hypertensive patients with renal disease and to compare the findings with those in hypertensive patients without renal disease. Methods. The CORONARIA study involved primary care patients with hypertension from all regions of Spain and included two groups with different degrees of renal disease. Results. In total, 703 patients (9.8%) had renal disease. Hypertensive patients with renal disease had a worse cardiovascular risk profile than other hypertensives. The prevalence of diabetes was double in patients with renal disease. Moreover, the risk of a coronary event was significantly higher in those with renal disease. One-third of hypertensives with renal disease had another previously diagnosed cardiovascular disease. In addition, they more frequently had a history of angina, were twice as likely to have had a myocardial infarction, and were more than twice as likely to have undergone revascularization or to have peripheral vascular disease or cerebrovascular disease. Heart failure was four times more frequent in these patients with renal disease than in other hypertensives. Conclusions. Patients with hypertension and renal disease have a higher risk of cardiovascular disease, exhibit an increased prevalence of diabetes, and suffer from more extensive target organ damage.

1885-5857/© 2006 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved

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