Revista Española de Cardiología (English Edition) Revista Española de Cardiología (English Edition)
Rev Esp Cardiol. 2012;65:47-53 - Vol. 65 Num.01 DOI: 10.1016/j.rec.2011.09.004

Patients With Atrial Fibrillation in a Primary Care Setting: Val-FAAP Study

Vivencio Barrios a,, Alberto Calderón b, Carlos Escobar c, Mariano de la Figuera d

a Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain
b Centro de Salud Rosa de Luxemburgo, San Sebastián de los Reyes, Madrid, Spain
c Servicio de Cardiología, Hospital Infanta Sofía, San Sebastián de los Reyes, Madrid, Spain
d Equipo de Atención Primaria Sardenya, CatSalut, Barcelona, Spain

Refers to

Change in Atrial Fibrillation Status, Comments to Val-FAAP Registry
Rafael Vidal-Pérez, Fernando Otero-Raviña, Victorino Turrado Turrado, José Ramón González-Juanatey
Rev Esp Cardiol. 2012;65:490-1
Full text - PDF

Keywords

Atrial fibrillation. Primary care. Clinical characteristics. Antithrombotic treatment.

Abstract

Objective

To assess the clinical characteristics of patients with atrial fibrillation in the primary care setting.

Methods

This was a 2-phase, cross-sectional, multicenter study: phase A assessed the proportion of atrial fibrillation patients assisted in primary care over 5 days; phase B analyzed atrial fibrillation patients’ clinical characteristics and management.

Results

In phase A, 119 526 subjects (age 52.9 [15.2] years; 40.9% male) received primary care in participating centers; 6.1% had atrial fibrillation. This proportion increased with age, hypertension, and male sex. In phase B, we analyzed 3287 atrial fibrillation patients (age 71.9 [10.1] years; 52.3% male). Risk factors were hypertension (92.6%), hypercholesterolemia (70.6%), related cardiovascular disease, heart failure (21.3%), and ischemic heart disease (20.9%). Permanent atrial fibrillation was the most frequent type of atrial fibrillation (45.3%). Age and cardiac and renal diseases were related to permanent atrial fibrillation development. Although more than two-thirds of patients had a CHADS2 score ≥2, about one-third of them were not taking anticoagulants; by contrast, 46.8% of patients with CHADS2=0 were taking oral anticoagulants.

Conclusions

In primary care, 6.1% of patients had atrial fibrillation. Patients with atrial fibrillation had high comorbidity. Anticoagulant treatment is far from optimal for atrial fibrillation patients in primary care.

1885-5857/© 2012 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved

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