Revista Española de Cardiología (English Edition) Revista Española de Cardiología (English Edition)
Rev Esp Cardiol. 2015;68:592-8 - Vol. 68 Num.07 DOI: 10.1016/j.rec.2014.07.029

Prevalence of Atherogenic Dyslipidemia in Spanish Hypertensive Patients and Its Relationship With Blood Pressure Control and Silent Organ Damage

Alejandro de la Sierra a,, Manuel Gorostidi b, Pedro Aranda c, Emili Corbella d, Xavier Pintó d

a Unidad de Hipertensión, Servicio de Medicina Interna, Hospital Mútua de Terrassa, Universidad de Barcelona, Terrassa, Barcelona, Spain
b Servicio de Nefrología, Hospital Universitario Central de Asturias, Oviedo, Asturias, Spain
c Servicio de Nefrología, Hospital Carlos Haya, Málaga, Spain
d Servicio de Medicina Interna, Hospital de Bellvitge, Universidad de Barcelona, L’Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona, Spain

Keywords

Hypertension. Atherogenic dyslipemia. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring. Target organ damage. Blood pressure control. Hypertryglyceridemia.

Abstract

Introduction and objectives

To assess the prevalence of atherogenic dyslipidemia in hypertensive patients and its relationship with risk profile and blood pressure control.

Methods

The study included 24 351 hypertensive patients from the Spanish Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring Registry. Atherogenic dyslipidemia was defined as the presence of hypertriglyceridemia (> 150 mg/dL) and low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (< 40 mg/dL in men and < 46 mg/dL in women). Blood pressure control was assessed by office and ambulatory monitoring.

Results

Atherogenic dyslipidemia was present in 2705 patients (11.1%). Of these, 30% had hypertriglyceridemia and 21.7% had low levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. Compared with patients without these risk factors, the former group were more often male (60% vs 52%), younger (57 years vs 59 years), had other risk factors and organ damage (microalbuminuria, reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate, and left ventricular hypertrophy), worse office, diurnal, and nocturnal blood pressure values (odds ratio 1.09, 1.06, and 1.10, respectively), and the lowest nocturnal blood pressure reduction (odds ratio = 1.07), despite the greater use of antihypertensive drugs.

Conclusions

Atherogenic dyslipidemia is present in more than 10% of hypertensive patients and is associated with other risk factors, organ damage, and poorer blood pressure control. Greater therapeutic effort is needed to reduce overall risk in these patients.

1885-5857/© 2015 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved

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