Revista Española de Cardiología (English Edition) Revista Española de Cardiología (English Edition)
Rev Esp Cardiol. 2011;64:379-84 - Vol. 64 Num.05 DOI: 10.1016/j.rec.2010.11.009

Validity of a Single-Factor Model Underlying the Metabolic Syndrome in Young Adults: Confirmatory Factor Analysis

Montserrat Solera-Martínez a,, Sara López-Martínez b, Mairena Sánchez-López a,c, Pablo Moya-Martínez a, Blanca Notario-Pacheco a, Natalia Arias-Palencia a, Pablo Franquelo-Morales d, Vicente Martínez-Vizcaíno a

a Centro de Estudios Sociosanitarios, Escuela Universitaria de Enfermería, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Cuenca, Spain
b Laboratorio, Hospital Virgen de la Luz, Cuenca, Spain
c Facultad de Educación, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, Ciudad Real, Spain
d Servicio de Urgencias, Hospital Virgen de la Luz, Cuenca, Spain

Keywords

Confirmatory factor analysis. Metabolic syndrome. Young adult. Physical activity. Aerobic capacity. Muscle strength.

Abstract

Introduction and objectives

To determine by confirmatory factor analysis whether a model of the metabolic syndrome including waist circumference-to-height ratio, as a measure of adiposity, has better goodness of fit than that based on waist circumference alone and, on the basis of the data of the best-fit model, to develop an index of global cardiometabolic risk in young adults.

Methods

Cross-sectional observational study involving 683 university students aged 18 to 30years, in their first year at the University of Castilla-La Mancha in Spain, during the 2009-10 academic year. We compared the best fit of 2 models of the metabolic syndrome, both of which included the triglyceride-to-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, HOMA-IR index, and mean arterial blood pressure, but differed in that one of them used waist circumference, whereas the other used the waist circumference-to-height ratio. A metabolic syndrome index (MSI) was constructed and its association with aerobic capacity, daily physical activity and muscle strength was estimated.

Results

The single-factor model that included waist circumference was a better indicator of goodness of fit. The MSI was inversely associated with aerobic capacity and muscle strength.

Conclusions

This study confirms that a single factor underlies the concept of metabolic syndrome; including the waist circumference-to-height ratio does not result in improvements over the model in which waist circumference alone is considered, and the development of a quantitative MSI may be useful for the quantification of cardiometabolic risk in clinical practice.

1885-5857/© 2011 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved

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