Publish in this journal
Journal Information
NOTICE Undefined index: paginaFinal (librerias/utilidadesHtml-cardio.php[88])
Vol. 60. Issue 10.
Pages 1092- (October 2007)
Share
Share
Download PDF
More article options
NOTICE Undefined index: paginaFinal (librerias/utilidadesHtml-cardio.php[88])
Vol. 60. Issue 10.
Pages 1092- (October 2007)
Full text access
Myocardial Calcification in Chronic Renal Failure
Calcificación miocárdica en la insuficiencia renal crónica
Visits
7090
Joaquín Martín-Cuarteroa, Domingo Yagüe-Romeoa, Elena Abril-Avellanasa
a Servicio de Radiodiagnóstico, Hospital Universitario Miguel Servet, Zaragoza, Spain
This item has received
7090
Visits
Article information
Full Text
Download PDF
Statistics
Figures (2)
Full Text

Cardiac calcifications are a frequent finding in imaging studies. These calcifications can be classified into dystrophic (when they occur in previously nonviable myocardium) and metastatic (in previously healthy myocardium). The former are more frequent and their location in the myocardium is associated with prior infarction or surgery, congenital defects, and bacterial myocarditis. Metastatic calcifications are related to bone disease, hypercalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, an increase in Ca??P product, renal failure, dialysis, and hypervitaminosis. They can be the cause of arrhythmias, heart failure, and even death.

In a 40-year-old man with chronic renal failure secondary to glomerular nephritis, extensive myocardial calcifications were discovered on a computed tomography (CT) study performed for other reasons. Subsequently, cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was carried out.

In the CT images (Figure 1), the calcifications (arrow) had a striated appearance and were located in the left ventricular wall and the interventricular septum. On MRI (T1-weighted fast spin-echo sequence in a 2-chamber view) (Figure 2), myocardial hypertrophy was documented, as well as signal loss (arrows) corresponding to calcifications. These features were more evident in the ventricular apex, left ventricular lateral wall, and interventricular septum, and were consistent with uremic cardiomyopathy with calcium deposits, together with hyperparathyroidism, secondary to the patient's renal failure.

Figure 1.

Figure 2.

Hyperuremia has been related to left ventricular hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis, microcirculation changes, decreased myocardial tolerance to ischemia, and a greater prevalence of arteriosclerosis.

Cardiac calcifications are common in patients with hyperparathyroidism, although they usually remain undetected except in postmortem pathologic anatomy studies.

Idiomas
Revista Española de Cardiología (English Edition)

Subscribe to our newsletter

Article options
Tools
es en

¿Es usted profesional sanitario apto para prescribir o dispensar medicamentos?

Are you a health professional able to prescribe or dispense drugs?

es en
Política de cookies Cookies policy
Utilizamos cookies propias y de terceros para mejorar nuestros servicios y mostrarle publicidad relacionada con sus preferencias mediante el análisis de sus hábitos de navegación. Si continua navegando, consideramos que acepta su uso. Puede cambiar la configuración u obtener más información aquí. To improve our services and products, we use "cookies" (own or third parties authorized) to show advertising related to client preferences through the analyses of navigation customer behavior. Continuing navigation will be considered as acceptance of this use. You can change the settings or obtain more information by clicking here.